How To Crate Train a Puppy – Crate Training a Puppy

How To Crate Train a Puppy – Crate Training a Puppy

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How To Crate Train a Puppy – Crate Training a Puppy

Watch as Expert Dog Trainer Kathy Santo talks about how to crate train your puppy. She’ll go over everything from the philosophy behind the crate training method to precautions you should take to make sure that it’s a positive experience for the both of you.

 Hi, I’m Kathy Santo with IAMS, and today we’re going to talk about how to crate train your puppy. We’ll begin with a general discussion on the philosophy supporting the crate training method. We’ll review what you’ll need, the steps involved in the process itself, and some possible troubles you may encounter along the way. Before you begin crate training, it helps to understand the philosophy behind this method. If your dog is properly crate trained, he’ll view his crate as a private room with a view, a safe haven he can call his own, and a quiet place he can relax in. He won’t see it as a rigid structure of confinement and punishment. In fact, it’ll be just the opposite. In nature, wild dogs seek out and use their den as a home where they can hide from danger, sleep, and raise their young. In your home, the crate becomes your puppy’s den, an ideal spot to sleep and stay out of harm’s way. And for you, the benefits of crate training are house training, because your puppy won’t like to soil the area where he sleeps, limited access to the rest of the house, where he learns the house rules, and transporting safely and easily in the car.

Start crate training a few days after your puppy settles in. Before you can start crate training, you and your family members must understand that the create can never be used for punishment. Never leave your young puppy under six months in his crate for more than three hours. He’ll get bored, have to go to the bathroom, and won’t understand why he’s been left alone in discomfort. As your dog gets older, he can be crated for longer periods of time, because his bladder isn’t as small. But keep in mind he still needs a healthy portion of exercise and attention daily. If you and your family are unable to accommodate your puppy’s exercise, feeding, and bathroom needs, consider hiring a dog walker or asking a neighbor or friend for assistance. After that, the crate should be a place he goes into voluntarily, with the door always open. There are a variety of crates available for purchase these days, each of which is designed for a different lifestyle need. When selecting a crate, you want to make sure it’s just large enough for your puppy to be able to stand up, turn around, and lay down in comfortably. Because your puppy will grow quickly, I often recommend getting a crate that fits the size you expect your puppy to grow to, and simply block off the excess crate space, so your dog can’t eliminate at one end and retreat to the other. The two most important things to remember while crate training are that it should be associated with something pleasant, and takes place in a series of small steps. The first step is to introduce your puppy to his crate. This will serve as his new den. Put bedding and chew toys in his crate, and let him investigate his area. If he chews or urinates on his bedding, permanently remove it.

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